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perlockholmes:

I’m sorry but what is that promo picture even??

nixxie-fic:

More beautiful Behind the Scenes pictures from 221 B Baker Street on BBC Sherlock - I adore the amount of detail that the set designers, buyers  & prop makers put into the show.

besbee:

that’s

that’s basically what happened 

yoshi-fl:

はじめてのおつかい

mid0nz:

The Golden Section in The Empty Hearse Torture Scene

One of the things I keep coming back to again and again from my conversation with Sherlock DP Steve Lawes was his emphasis on how important the rule of thirds and the golden section are to him as a cinematographer, and how he composes Sherlock’s frames on these principles. Most photographers do use the rule of thirds for visual interest, for symmetry… But Steve talks about how he uses it to tell a story.

I work on the golden section which is basically the rule of thirds, which is where you place things in a frame. You’ve only got to look at fine art and look at framing within fine art and in any particular well-known picture you’ll see that everything is in a particular part of the frame for a reason. It tells the story. The story is told by where things are in relationship in the frame whether they’re central in the frame, whether they’re peripheral.

-Steve Lawes, Director of Photography, The Empty Hearse

So what stories does Steve tell with his framing? If you look at the original screencap without the overlays you might think the focal point of the lighting is that obnoxious bare bulb, but it’s not. The curves of the golden spiral fit EXACTLY over the circle of shining light. And that golden spiral originates with the light over Sherlock’s head. The curves of the spiral fit EXACTLY around the curve of the shade. Now the golden rectangle.  It doesn’t matter where you orient it— right or left or, as in the last image, you overlay both— because the action of the frame happens exactly between them. No matter how you slice this incredible image, the subject matter falls along a golden ratio. Look at Mycroft, for example. In each composition he fits! But still I come back to the light over Sherlock’s head. That is the focal point of the spiral. I kept having an argument with my S.O. b/c she said— no it’s the bare bulb you’re supposed to be looking at. But that’s not right— well it may be what you look at, but it’s not the crux of the composition— the overhead light is. The golden spiral originating over the hanging light shade is even more obvious with Tomi May’s character out of the light. (Bottom image.)

So what’s the camera POV? Doesn’t this look like a keyhole? Isn’t this what the guard with the headphones might see if he was peeking through the door? The tracking sequence before this is cool— go look at it again.

Now we’re not supposed to know this is Mycroft yet (I didn’t the first time I watched it) and we’re not certain it’s Sherlock, either, So how does the lighting both highlight and obscure them so that their reveals are exciting and amusing? These are the questions the production team had to answer in order to decide how to frame the story.

This looks like a crucifixion, of course. Like Dali’s Christ of Saint John of the Cross a little bit.

God this is so rich! I can’t even…

How can you not love Graham Gavin Greg Lestrade?

shootbadcabbies:

ladybugs were my favorite animals as a kid

shootbadcabbies:

ladybugs were my favorite animals as a kid

daftlock (sorry! not sorry!)

bakerstreetbabes:

sakibatch:

moriarty-pet:

I would watch the hell out of this.

oh boy would i

Hell yeah.

bakerstreetbabes:

sakibatch:

moriarty-pet:

I would watch the hell out of this.

oh boy would i

Hell yeah.

sen•ti•ment (ˈsɛn tə mənt) 

leyla-lovely:

Rococo-AU
I rewatched Marie Antoinette some while ago and then saw 12 Years A Salve. And seeing Benedict in vintage fashion brought me to this. :D
Ben has such an unique face. It’s like he was made to be a pretty aristocrat. <3

leyla-lovely:

Rococo-AU

I rewatched Marie Antoinette some while ago and then saw 12 Years A Salve. And seeing Benedict in vintage fashion brought me to this. :D

Ben has such an unique face. It’s like he was made to be a pretty aristocrat. <3